Glasgow welcomes STFC Introductory Solar System Plasmas Summer School

The School’s objective is to bring internationally leading UK scientists to instruct and inspire the incoming PhD students. It will provide them with the broad context in which their specific research will reside, and encourage interdisciplinary thinking from the outset.

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Twitter updates on CESRA school from our PhD students

Thanks to Paul Wright and Duncan Stackhouse one can follow CESRA school via twitter #CESRA2015


Solar radio school in 30 sec

Hamish Reid and Natasha Jeffrey speak about radio school in a short UoG video


Group’s work features on BBC’s Sky at Night

NuSTAR, XRT and AIA

BBC’s Sky at Night programme this month features work by Dr Iain Hannah on small explosive releases of energy in the Sun’s atmosphere observed by NASA’s NuSTAR telescope. These observations are trying to catch the faint X-ray signatures of electrons being accelerated which would give clues to the physics powering these events.

 

 


Solar Radio Summer School

Glasgow University is hosting the 2015 CESRA radio summer school. The school is open to solar radio physicists including PhD students and early career researchers.  The school will cover the essential elements of theory, modelling and data analysis and will feature lectures and tutorials.  Students will have the opportunity to meet and discuss research topics with their peers together in an informal atmosphere.

Further details: http://www.astro.gla.ac.uk/cesra2015/

 


Group welcomes RadioSun visitors

Baolin Tan (China), Alexey Kuznetsov (Irkutsk, Russia) and Sergei Kuznetsov and Alexander Morgachev (Pulkovo, Russia) visit our group to work on the solar flares and radio emission from the Sun. The visits are supported by pan-European EU funded network ‘RadioSun’  involving China, Czech Republic, Poland, Russia and the UK.


Observatory Refurb – Update 5

The University’s observatory at Acre Rd is being refurbished over the summer – below are some photos showing the good progress that has been made. Lot’s has been done since the fifth, fourth, third, second and first set of pictures.

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Scotland and India are working together to study eruptions on the Sun

Dr Prasad Subramanian, an associate professor of Physics at IISER Pune, visited the Glasgow Astronomy Group to study eruptions on the Sun. The collaboration is associated with the renewal of an agreement between University of Glasgow and Indian Institute of Science Education and Research in Pune (IISER-Pune).


Students and staff gathered at NJIT to share the latest research

Duncan Stackhouse, Nic Bian, Iain Hannah and Eduard Kontar jointed solar flare experts from around the world gathered at NJIT last week to share the latest research with RHESSI at 14th RHESSI workshop.


Group members take on new IAU roles

Congratulations to Eduard Kontar and Nic Labrosse who have been newly elected to positions in the International Astronomical Union. Eduard has been elected to the Steering Committee of Division E (Sun and Heliosphere) and Nic to the Steering Committee of Commission E1 (Solar Radiation and Structure). Lyndsay Fletcher also takes over the Presidency of Commission E2 (Solar Activity) and remains as an ex officio member of Division E. All three group members formally assume their new roles after the closing ceremony of the XXIXth General Assembly of the IAU in Honolulu on 14th August 2015.


Observatory Refurb – Update 4

The University’s observatory at Acre Rd is being refurbished over the summer – below are some photos showing the current progress. Lot’s has been done since the fourth, third, second and first set of pictures.

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Observatory Refurb – Update 3

The University’s observatory at Acre Rd is being refurbished over the summer – below are some photos showing the current progress. Lot’s has been done since the third, second and first set of pictures.

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NASA Image of the Day

NuSTAR, XRT and AIA

Work by A&A Group member Dr Iain Hannah has featured in a recent image/press release by the Royal Astronomical Society and NASA, showing an image of new X-ray observations of small flares (or microflares) taken with NASA’s NuSTAR telescope (blue in the image), combined with those in EUV from SDO/AIA (red/yellow) and lower energy X-rays from Hinode/XRT (green). This image recently featured as NASA’s image of the day.


Observatory Refurb – Update 2

The University’s observatory at Acre Rd is being refurbished over the summer – below are some photos showing the current progress. Lot’s has been done since the second and first set of pictures.

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Funded PhD studentship

Funded PhD studentship in Solar Physics at the University of Glasgow

glasgow_pic3A fully funded PhD studentship for a UK/EU student is available at the University of Glasgow in solar flare physics. The project title is “Connections between solar flare characteristics and their underlying magnetic drivers” and will be using some of the latest solar data to investigate EUV/X-ray flare signatures relative to their magnetic properties derived from magnetograms. The primary supervisor will be Dr. Iain Hannah, the secondary Prof. Lyndsay Fletcher, within the Astronomy & Astrophysics group in the SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Glasgow, UK.

The PhD studentship will start between 1st August to 1st October 2015 for 3 years and has funding, from the University of Glasgow, for the fees (of a UK or EU student) and annual stipend (currently about £14,000).

Applicants should have (by the start date) at least a second class degree (or equivalent) in a relevant subject and ideally some experience of solar data analysis – coding in IDL, SolarSoft and/or Python.

Applications need to be made by Monday 15th June 2015 through the University of Glasgow’s postgraduate research opportunities page: http://www.gla.ac.uk/research/opportunities/howtoapplyforaresearchdegree/

Additional information on the application procedure is available on the School’s website: http://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/physics/research/postgraduate/

For more information please feel free to contact Dr Hannah at iain.hannah@glasgow.ac.uk


Observatory Refurb – Update 1

The University’s observatory at Acre Rd is being refurbished over the summer – below are some photos showing the current progress. The internal walls have been demolished since the last set of pictures of the obs refurb.

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Observatory Refurbishment

The University’s observatory at Acre Rd is being refurbished over the summer – below are some photos showing the current progress.

Graham`s office

library

Main corridor flooring removed

Reception screened off for asbestos works

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arrival of site office

Site office in position

Site offices


Congratulations to Duncan Stackhouse

Duncan Stackhouse presented the best talk (about simulation of ‘kappa’ distribution and  Numerical and Observational Examination of the Spectral Variation of Extended Coronal Hard X-Ray Sources of kappa-distribution) among 3rd year Ph.D. students of the school at the colloquium session (Wed May 6th, 2015).


Solar Eclipse Success!

The maximum eclipse (94%) in Glasgow.

The maximum eclipse (94%) in Glasgow.

Although the sky this morning had a Glasgow filter (i.e. the clouds) we were able to catch the progress of the moon throughout its journey across the face of the sun. At the very moment of maximum, the clouds thinned slightly, showing the eclipsed sun smiling down on us at the University of Glasgow. Thanks to all the staff and students that helped out and all the folk that came along and saw the eclipse.

The moon starts to eclipse the sun, with a sunspot also visible on the solar surface.

The moon starts to eclipse the sun, with a sunspot also visible on the solar surface.

The maximum eclipse (94%) in Glasgow.

The maximum eclipse (94%) in Glasgow.

The maximum eclipse caught on camera, with the University of Glasgow tower overlooking.

The maximum eclipse caught on camera, with the University of Glasgow tower overlooking.

The moon moving away, showing more of the solar surface again.

The moon moving away, showing more of the solar surface and sunspot again.

A large crowd gathered at the flagpole (thanks to https://twitter.com/pjasimoes)

A large crowd gathered at the flagpole watching the clouded eclipse (thanks to @pjasimoes).

And the large crowd extends further along, watching the clouded eclipse

And the large crowd extends further along, watching the clouded eclipse at the University of Glasgow (thanks to @pjasimoes)

Eclipse viewers gathered at the Library and Fraser building waiting for the eclipse to peak.

Eclipse viewers gathered at the Library and Fraser building waiting for the eclipse to peak (photo thanks to Laurence Datrier).

The moon eclipsing the sun captured on our live feed from our Acre Rd Observatory

The moon eclipsing the sun captured on our live feed from our Acre Rd Observatory

The students (Duncan Horne, Ruaridh Newman Andrew Barr, William Newman) at the observatory running the live feed

The students (Duncan Horne, Ruaridh Newman
Andrew Barr, William Newman) at the Acre Rd Observatory running the live feed

Some of the Glasgow solar PhD students (Paul Wright, Stephen Brown, Galina Motorina) broadcasting live with STV's Sean Batty during the eclipse

Some of the Glasgow solar PhD students (Paul Wright, Stephen Brown, Galina Motorina) broadcasting live with STV’s Sean Batty during the eclipse (photo thanks to Stephen Brown). You can rewatch the broadcast here.


Solar Eclipse – Live Feed

A rare partial solar eclipse will be viewable in Glasgow on Friday March 20th, with the maximum eclipse (the moon covering 94% of the Sun) occurring at 09:34am.

We have a live* feed at http://www.astro.gla.ac.uk/eclipse/live.html from University of Glasgow Observatory, updated every minute. There are also two viewing locations on the Main Campus University of Glasgow, where there will be telescopes and viewers to let you safely see the eclipse directly (weather permitting)

Thanks to the undergraduate solar project group, Peter Wakeford and Graham Kerr for setting this up and making the observations.

*The feed will be live and update during 8am to 11am Friday 20th March. Before then it will show a static test image taken with the same telescope & filter setup.


Solar Eclipse March 20th

eclipse_posterUpdate: The weather forecast for Friday morning in Glasgow is currently cloudy/variable but we will be out in force hoping for gaps in the clouds.

We also have a live feed of the eclipse from the University of Glasgow Observatory.

A rare partial solar eclipse will be viewable in Glasgow on Friday March 20th, with the maximum eclipse (the moon covering 94% of the Sun) occurring at 09:34am.

We at the University of Glasgow will be hosting (weather permitting) eclipse viewing areas where anyone can come along to safely* see the eclipse through our telescopes and viewers, with experts on hand to explain what is happening. These will be located at the Flag pole/South Front of the main University building and near the entrance to the Fraser building and Library between the times of the eclipse (08:30am to 10:43am), see the poster/map.

For more information please contact Iain Hannah.

*Do not look directly at the Sun with you naked eyes or through an unfiltered telescope/binoculars even during the eclipse. Only use specially designed filters/glasses (not sunglasses) or a pinhole or projection method to observe the eclipse. More information to safely view an eclipse is available here, this guide from the Royal Astronomical Society [pdf], or from the BBC’s Stargazing Live [pdf].


Congratulations to Graham Kerr

Graham Kerr, a PhD student in the Astronomy and Astrophysics Group, has won the School of Physics and Astronomy’s Thomson Prize for his second year report on Observations and Modelling of Solar Chromospheric Flares. Well done Graham!

Locations of optical sources in a white light flare, colour coded by time (from Kerr & Fletcher 2014)

Locations of optical sources in a white light flare, colour coded by time (from Kerr & Fletcher 2014)


Glasgow astronomers join UK DKIST consortium

The School of Physics and Astronomy has joined the UK Consortium for the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope currently being constructed on the summit of Haleakala mountain in Hawai’i. This 4m diameter telescope will address fundamental questions at the core of contemporary solar physics. It will do this via high-speed (sub-second) imaging, spectroscopic and magnetic measurements of the solar photosphere, chromosphere and corona. DKIST will be mainly funded by the US National Science Foundation. The UK DKIST Consortium, funded also by the STFC and in kind by Andor Technology, exists to design and build the cameras for 4 DKIST instruments, develop processing and data analysis tools, and support UK observing proposals.

Rendering of DKIST dome. Image: NSO/NSF/AURA

Rendering of DKIST dome. Image: NSO/NSF/AURA


Congrats to Prof Hendry MBE

Congratulations to Professor Martin Hendry for being awarded an MBE in the New Year Honours List for services to Public Engagement in Science.

 

 

 

 

 

 


First NuSTAR image of the Sun

NuSTAR Sun

Above is the first image of the Sun taken by NASA’s X-ray telescope NuSTAR. The blue and green are NuSTAR X-rays in 2-3 keV and 3-5 keV, overlaid onto EUV emission from SDO/AIA (red). This image was recently released and has featured on many news sites (BBC, Time, National Geographic, etc) and made it to the Astronomy picture of the day. A&A’s Dr. Iain Hannah and Dr. Hugh Hudson are part of the NuSTAR solar team that is using this X-ray telescope, that normally looks at distant blackholes, to probe faint signatures of heating and particle acceleration in the solar atmosphere.